Agripalooza!

An Educational Field Day

Each September, Marquette and Alger Conservation Districts host an educational field day at the Michigan State University Upper Peninsula Research and Extension Center in Chatham, MI. This day is geared towards 5th grade students who attend from schools around the two-county area. We’ve had schools participate all the way from Grand Marias to Powell Township, and schools as far South as Wells Township.

The day consists of over 25 professional presenters getting students engaged in conservation practices, healthy food choices, agricultural activities, as well as wildlife management and watershed health. These are just a few topics, as we gain more presenters and more topics every year.

Environmental Education

300+ Students Each Year

Over 25 Presenters

Hands-On learning

Join Agripalooza!

Become A Presenter

Are you a professional in the conservation or agriculture field? Are you an expert on an environmental toppic? Are you a local food enthusiast? Join our group of amazing volunteer presenters! 

We are always looking for folks who can make the day even better for the students. Some topics our presenters have covered in the past: recycling, soil health, composting, invasive species, renewable energy, beekeeping, apple heterozygosity and more! Please contact our District Manager to become a presenter at the next Agripalooza!

Bring Your Students

Are you interested in bringing your students to Agripalooza? Agripalooza is a great learning opportunity for students, and we are always looking to get as many schools involved as possible! Please contact our Outreach Coordinator for a chance to participate in Agripalooza!

share This!

Facebook
Pinterest
LinkedIn
All

Forestry & Wildlife Management Assistance

The Forest and Wildlife Management Assistance Program of Marquette and Alger Counties promotes stewardship of forest resources on private lands. This free program offers landowners assistance with managing wildlife habitat, timber production, tree planting, recreation, and forest health, as well as urban forestry and backyard wildlife. We provide on site consultation, basic written information, and referrals to other service providers free of charge. Management suggestions are based on sound resource science and the landowner’s goals.

Read More »
On-Farm-Produce-FI
All

On-Farm Produce Safety

Produce Safety Technicians offer FREE & CONFIDENTIAL education and assistance to fresh produce growers regarding their on-farm food safety practices. Safe food practices minimizes the risk of foodborne illnesses, and helps keep the people who eat fresh produce safe.

Read More »
All

Lake To Lake CISMA

Free invasive species management The Lake to Lake Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (L2L CISMA) is a multi-agency and multi-community group created in 2008 to

Read More »
All

Pollinator Information

The Marquette County Conservation District recognizes the essential role that pollinators have in our society. Pollinators are responsible for 1/3 of the food we eat, and the best way to support pollinators is by creating habitat for them! Each year MCCD makes it a priority to take on several native gardening projects in order to increase pollinator habitat in Marquette County.

Read More »
nrcsrcpp2_orig
All

Natural Resources Conservation Service Partnership

The Soil Conservation Service was established in 1935 in response to the Dust Bowl. In 1937, the first county Conservation District was formed to link federal agency resources with the local farmers. Since then, nearly 3000 Conservation Districts have been organized. This partnership between NRCS and the Conservation Districts is one that was carefully designed. This unique and productive relationship continues to be a model for providing Federal resources at the local level.

Read More »
All

Wetland Mitigation

Protecting watersheds and wetlands is a priority for the Marquette County Conservation District. Wetland mitigation involves the replacement of unavoidably lost wetland resources with created or restored wetlands, with the goal of replacing as fully as possible the functions and public benefits of the lost wetland.

Read More »